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The Celtic cross erected on Grosse Île in 1909 to commemorate the predominantly Irish victims of the 1847 typhus epidemic.

The Celtic cross erected on Grosse Île in 1909 to commemorate the predominantly Irish victims of the 1847 typhus epidemic.

(Source: collectionscanada.gc.ca)

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The Great Potato Famine in Ireland in the years 1845-1849 forced thousands of Irishmen to flee their home country. One of their destinations was Quebec, Canada. The Canadian government chose Grosse Island, in the Gulf of St Lawrence, as the island to house Irish immigrants before allowing them to enter Canada.
From 1832 to 1848, thousands of Irish immigrants landed on Grosse Island—and many of them would never leave. Over 5,000 Irish were buried on Grosse Island—a fact which makes it the largest Irish Potato Famine cemetery outside Ireland.
In the year 1847, a massive typhus outbreak killed thousands on the island and aboard the ships. For those passengers lucky enough to get off the ships, perfunctory health checks allowed thousands of desperate and sick immigrants to leave the island and make their way to cities such as Montreal, risking further spread of the epidemic. “Fever sheds” were set up in Montreal to try to isolate these infected and sick people, and it is estimated that as many as 6000 additional victims died there. Incidentally, one immigrant who did make it off Grosse Island safely was the grandfather of Henry Ford.

The Great Potato Famine in Ireland in the years 1845-1849 forced thousands of Irishmen to flee their home country. One of their destinations was Quebec, Canada. The Canadian government chose Grosse Island, in the Gulf of St Lawrence, as the island to house Irish immigrants before allowing them to enter Canada.

From 1832 to 1848, thousands of Irish immigrants landed on Grosse Island—and many of them would never leave. Over 5,000 Irish were buried on Grosse Island—a fact which makes it the largest Irish Potato Famine cemetery outside Ireland.

In the year 1847, a massive typhus outbreak killed thousands on the island and aboard the ships. For those passengers lucky enough to get off the ships, perfunctory health checks allowed thousands of desperate and sick immigrants to leave the island and make their way to cities such as Montreal, risking further spread of the epidemic. “Fever sheds” were set up in Montreal to try to isolate these infected and sick people, and it is estimated that as many as 6000 additional victims died there. Incidentally, one immigrant who did make it off Grosse Island safely was the grandfather of Henry Ford.

(Source: listverse.com, via irish-history)

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March 26, 1832 - The Legislature of Lower Canada authorizes the establishment of a quarantine station on Grosse Île in the St. Lawrence River.
During 1847, over 5,000 immigrants bound for Quebec died at sea and another 5,424 are buried at Grosse Île. Many were fleeing the Irish potato famine and the western cemetery on the island is now recognized as holding the largest number of victims of the Great Famine outside of Ireland.

March 26, 1832 - The Legislature of Lower Canada authorizes the establishment of a quarantine station on Grosse Île in the St. Lawrence River.

During 1847, over 5,000 immigrants bound for Quebec died at sea and another 5,424 are buried at Grosse Île. Many were fleeing the Irish potato famine and the western cemetery on the island is now recognized as holding the largest number of victims of the Great Famine outside of Ireland.

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jakealoo:

Photogravures of Ottawa near the turn of the last century, including one of the original Centre Block on Parliament Hill. The Centre Block was destroyed by fire on Feb. 3, 1916 and replaced by the Peace Tower. It was named in honour of the Canadian soldiers who died in the First World War and took 11 years to construct.

(via oldcanada)

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silentambassadors:

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police began operations on this date in 1920, following a Parliamentary vote to merge the North-West Mounted Police with the Dominion Police.  The NWMP was founded in 1873 in response to the need for law enforcement in the newly acquired western territories—and were originally set to be called the North-West Mounted Rifles, but Canada’s southern neighbor deemed “rifles” to be too incendiary a title and strong-armed the Canadian government into changing it.  Wouldn’t want the Canucks to get ideas about militarization above their station, gods forbid.  Mounties are now some of the most widely recognized law enforcement officers in the world, not least of all [this stamp enthusiast would argue] because of Paul Gross’s enchanting portrayal of Constable Benton Fraser in Due South.  For a more historical, more biographical look at the Mounties in action, read Mrs. Mike by Benedict and Nancy Freeman.

Stamp details:
Stamp on top:
Issued on: June 1, 1935
From: Ottawa, Canada
SC #223

Middle stamps:
Issued on: March 9, 1973
From: Ottawa, Canada
SC #612-614

Stamps on bottom:
Issued on: July 3, 1998
From: Ottawa, Canada
SC #1737b

(Source: canadiandesignresource.ca)

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December 28, 1859 - The Nor’Wester, the first newspaper on the Canadian Prairies, begins publication in the Red River Settlement. 

December 28, 1859 - The Nor’Wester, the first newspaper on the Canadian Prairies, begins publication in the Red River Settlement. 

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December 25, 1875 - Fort Brisebois, named after its commander Inspector Ephrem Brisebois, is ready for occupation. Built at the junction of the Bow and Elbow rivers, the fort is renamed Fort Calgary in 1876.

December 25, 1875 - Fort Brisebois, named after its commander Inspector Ephrem Brisebois, is ready for occupation. Built at the junction of the Bow and Elbow rivers, the fort is renamed Fort Calgary in 1876.

(Source: collectionscanada.gc.ca)

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thefortmuseum:

FMP.80.173
Macleod, Alberta  Christmas Day,1921
1921 Christmas Dinner at the Macleod Barracks.  Mounties in full dress.
In 1919 the barracks became a reserve squadron and housed M Division.  In 1922 the post was closed.  This image is likely a photo of the last Christmas held at the Fort Macleod Barracks.  
Image part of the Fort Museum archives.

thefortmuseum:

FMP.80.173

Macleod, Alberta  Christmas Day,1921

1921 Christmas Dinner at the Macleod Barracks.  Mounties in full dress.

In 1919 the barracks became a reserve squadron and housed M Division.  In 1922 the post was closed.  This image is likely a photo of the last Christmas held at the Fort Macleod Barracks.  

Image part of the Fort Museum archives.

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December 23, 1893 - World War I fighter pilot Arthur Roy Brown is born in Carleton Place, Ontario. Brown was officially credited with shooting down Manfred von Richthofen, the “Red Baron”.

December 23, 1893 - World War I fighter pilot Arthur Roy Brown is born in Carleton Place, Ontario. Brown was officially credited with shooting down Manfred von Richthofen, the “Red Baron”.

Tags: WWI
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December 21, 1883 - The formation of the Infantry School Corps is authorized, marking the beginning of Canada’s first professional army. Renamed the Royal Canadian Regiment in 1899, it is still active today as part of 2nd Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group. 

December 21, 1883 - The formation of the Infantry School Corps is authorized, marking the beginning of Canada’s first professional army. Renamed the Royal Canadian Regiment in 1899, it is still active today as part of 2nd Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group