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silentambassadors:

On August 27, 1927, five Canadian women asked the Supreme Court of Canada, “Does the word ‘Persons’ in Section 24 of the British North America Act, 1867, include female persons?”  These five women [known variously as the Famous Five or the Valiant Five: Emily Murphy, Nellie McClung, Louise McKinney, Henrietta Edwards, and Irene Parlby (Irene needs a stamp, Canada Post!)] rocked the Canadian judicial system and ultimately led to Privy Council answering a reluctant “yes.”  Les femmes sont des personnes!  Whee!

Stamp details:
Stamp on top:
Issued on: April 17, 1985
From: Ottawa, Canada
SC #1048

Middle stamp:
Issued on: August 29, 1973
From: Ottawa, Canada
SC #622

Stamps on bottom:
Issued on: March 4, 1981
From: Ottawa, Canada
SC #880, 882

(Source: famouscanadianwomen.com)

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August 22, 1917 - Uloqsaq and Sinnisiak, the first Inuit convicted of murder under Canadian law, go on trial in Calgary for the 1913 murder of Oblate missionaries Jean-Baptiste Rouvière and Guillaume Le Roux. Their death sentence is commuted to life imprisonment at the Royal Northwest Mounted Police post in Fort Resolution, Northwest Territories.

August 22, 1917 - Uloqsaq and Sinnisiak, the first Inuit convicted of murder under Canadian law, go on trial in Calgary for the 1913 murder of Oblate missionaries Jean-Baptiste Rouvière and Guillaume Le Roux. Their death sentence is commuted to life imprisonment at the Royal Northwest Mounted Police post in Fort Resolution, Northwest Territories.

(Source: collectionscanada.gc.ca)

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August 20, 1884 - British Colonial Secretary Lord Derby asks for the assistance of Canadian voyageurs in an expedition up the Nile River to rescue Major-General Charles Gordon’s besieged troops in Khartoum. Nile Expedition leader General Garnet Wolseley had led British forces against Louis Riel’s 1870 Red River resistance and believed the Canadians would reliably help him transport troops and supplies up the Nile.

August 20, 1884 - British Colonial Secretary Lord Derby asks for the assistance of Canadian voyageurs in an expedition up the Nile River to rescue Major-General Charles Gordon’s besieged troops in Khartoum. Nile Expedition leader General Garnet Wolseley had led British forces against Louis Riel’s 1870 Red River resistance and believed the Canadians would reliably help him transport troops and supplies up the Nile.

(Source: piloninternational.ca)

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(Source: moonshot5)

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akfung:

August 9 was selected as National Peacekeepers’ Day to recognize the greatest single loss of Canadian lives on a peacekeeping mission, which occurred on that date in 1974. Here are fragments displayed in the Museum from that very tragedy when Buffalo 115461, a Royal Canadian Air Force transport aircraft was shot down on August 9, 1974 by Syrian surface-to-air missiles. All nine passengers and crew were killed. The incident represents the greatest single loss of life in Canadian peacekeeping history. For more information on National Peacekeeper’s Day, click here.

akfung:

August 9 was selected as National Peacekeepers’ Day to recognize the greatest single loss of Canadian lives on a peacekeeping mission, which occurred on that date in 1974.

Here are fragments displayed in the Museum from that very tragedy when Buffalo 115461, a Royal Canadian Air Force transport aircraft was shot down on August 9, 1974 by Syrian surface-to-air missiles. All nine passengers and crew were killed. The incident represents the greatest single loss of life in Canadian peacekeeping history.

For more information on National Peacekeeper’s Day, click here.

(Source: facebook.com)

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silentambassadors:

On July 27, 1921, Canadian scientist Frederick Banting proved that insulin regulates blood sugar, a great breakthrough in the treatment of diabetes.  He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine (jointly with J. J. R. Macleod) in 1923 at the age of 32, still the youngest Nobel Laureate in that field, and subsequently shared the prize money with his colleague Dr. Charles Best.  [For inquiring minds: Lawrence Bragg is the youngest person awarded a Nobel Prize, in physics in 1915 at the age of 25.]  In a recent CBC survey, Banting was named the fourth most important Canadian by viewers (for inquiring minds: first, second, and third were Tommy Douglas, Terry Fox, and Pierre Trudeau).  He was killed in a plane crash in 1941.  A flame of hope was lit in 1989 in Sir Frederick Banting Square, London, ON, and will remain burning until a cure for diabetes is found.

Stamp details:
Top left:
Issued on: March 15, 1991
From: Ottawa, Canada
SC #1304

Top right:
Issued on: January 17, 2000
From: Ottawa, Canada
SC #1822a

Middle left:
Issued on: March 16, 2001
From: Boston, MA
SC #3503

Middle right:
Issued on: August 7, 1971
From: Brussels, Belgium
SC #811

Stamp on bottom:
Issued on: September 23, 1971
From: Bern, Switzerland
MC #959

(Source: colnect.com)

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silentambassadors:

In one of his only official duties as king before abdicating, Edward VIII unveiled the Canadian National Vimy Memorial on this date in 1936.  The Battle of Vimy Ridge, part of the larger British offensive in and around Arras in the spring of 1917, was one of the most important victories for the many Canadian troops sent over there for God & Empire—not only because taking the ridge helped the British tactically, but also because all four divisions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force fought together for the first time during this battle—a pivotal moment in Canadian national history.  The Memorial was designed by Walter Seymour Allward and covers 250 acres of the battleground, commemorating not only the dead at Vimy, but the presumed dead and missing from the entirety of the Great War (there are a total of 11,285 names on the memorial, although since its construction, 116 of the men commemorated have been found and proper headstones erected for them).  Here is the inscription:

To the valour of their countrymen in the Great War and in memory of their sixty thousand dead this monument is raised by the people of Canada.

À la vaillance de ses fils pendant la Grande Guerre et en mémoire de ses soixante mille morts, le peuple canadien a élevé ce monument.

[It should be noted that Canada did not have time to issue a stamp of King Edward VIII while he was king—the stamp is of him as the Prince of Wales.]

Stamp details:
Top left:
Issued on: October 15, 1968
From: Ottawa, Canada
SC #486

Top right:
Issued on: July 12, 1932
From: Ottawa, CanadaSC #193

Stamps on bottom:
Issued on: July 26, 1936
From: Paris, France
MC #322-323

(Source: stamps-plus.com)

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July 3, 1608 - French explorer Samuel de Champlain founds what will become Quebec City.

July 3, 1608 - French explorer Samuel de Champlain founds what will become Quebec City.

(Source: images.recitus.qc.ca)

Tags: New France
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silentambassadors:

The St. Lawrence Seaway/la Voie Maritime du Saint-Laurent opened on this date in 1959, linking the Atlantic Ocean (via the St. Lawrence River) with the western end of Lake Huron.  A truly remarkable feat of engineering, this series of binational locks and canals was first proposed in the 1890s but suffered a number of set-backs on both sides of the border before finally gaining enough support (largely Canadian) in the early 1950s.  The St. Lawrence River (and gulf) (and, in fact, Canada in general) was named by Jacques Cartier in 1535 after the martyr Lawrence of Rome—Cartier first spied the estuary of the St. Lawrence on St. Lawrence’s feast day (August 10, the date Lawrence was martyred—after being roasted on a gridiron for what must have seemed an interminable length of time, he reputedly declared, “It is well done, turn me over!”) (Lawrence is now associated with chefs and cooks) (a bit morbidly).  Happy international cooperation and collaboration—both in engineering and philately!  The stamp on the left is the first joint issue the United States released.  Yay, neighbors to the north!

Stamp details:
Stamp on top:
Issued on: June 26, 1959
From: Massena, NY; Ottawa, Canada
Designed by: Arnold Copeland, Ervine Metzl, William H. Buckley, and Gerald Trottier
SC #1131

Stamp on bottom:
Issued on: June 26, 1984
From: Massena, NY; Ottawa, Canada
Designed by: Ernst Barenscher
SC #2091

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lindahall:

Sir John Ross - Scientist of the Day

John Ross, an officer in the Royal Navy, was born June 24, 1777. He was chosen in 1818 by John Barrow of the Admiralty to command the first of the modern searches for the Northwest Passage (Barrow was our Scientist of the Day for June 19, 2014). Ross took his ship, HMS Isabella, up Baffin Bay, all the way to the entrance of the Arctic archipelago, which was called Lancaster Sound. He then declared that the Sound was blocked by a chain of mountains (which he named the Croker mountains), and he turned around and came home, much to the surprise of his junior officers, who could not see the mountains at all. Barrow was furious with Ross, and guaranteed that he would never get another command (which he did not). Barrow promptly sent Ross’s second-in-command, Edward Parry, back the next year, and Parry sailed right though the phantom Croker mountains and made it half-way across Canada. However, Ross’s book about his voyage of 1818 was a beautiful production and shows that he did far more than twiddle his thumbs up there in Baffin Bay, even if he did turn back prematurely. All the images on this page were taken from his book, A Voyage of Discovery (1819). We displayed this work in our 2008 exhibition, Ice: A Victorian Romance, where you can see some other images from this pioneering work.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(Source: lhldigital.lindahall.org, via arcticmuseum)