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July 3, 1608 - French explorer Samuel de Champlain founds what will become Quebec City.

July 3, 1608 - French explorer Samuel de Champlain founds what will become Quebec City.

(Source: images.recitus.qc.ca)

Tags: New France
Photoset

silentambassadors:

The St. Lawrence Seaway/la Voie Maritime du Saint-Laurent opened on this date in 1959, linking the Atlantic Ocean (via the St. Lawrence River) with the western end of Lake Huron.  A truly remarkable feat of engineering, this series of binational locks and canals was first proposed in the 1890s but suffered a number of set-backs on both sides of the border before finally gaining enough support (largely Canadian) in the early 1950s.  The St. Lawrence River (and gulf) (and, in fact, Canada in general) was named by Jacques Cartier in 1535 after the martyr Lawrence of Rome—Cartier first spied the estuary of the St. Lawrence on St. Lawrence’s feast day (August 10, the date Lawrence was martyred—after being roasted on a gridiron for what must have seemed an interminable length of time, he reputedly declared, “It is well done, turn me over!”) (Lawrence is now associated with chefs and cooks) (a bit morbidly).  Happy international cooperation and collaboration—both in engineering and philately!  The stamp on the left is the first joint issue the United States released.  Yay, neighbors to the north!

Stamp details:
Stamp on top:
Issued on: June 26, 1959
From: Massena, NY; Ottawa, Canada
Designed by: Arnold Copeland, Ervine Metzl, William H. Buckley, and Gerald Trottier
SC #1131

Stamp on bottom:
Issued on: June 26, 1984
From: Massena, NY; Ottawa, Canada
Designed by: Ernst Barenscher
SC #2091

Photoset

lindahall:

Sir John Ross - Scientist of the Day

John Ross, an officer in the Royal Navy, was born June 24, 1777. He was chosen in 1818 by John Barrow of the Admiralty to command the first of the modern searches for the Northwest Passage (Barrow was our Scientist of the Day for June 19, 2014). Ross took his ship, HMS Isabella, up Baffin Bay, all the way to the entrance of the Arctic archipelago, which was called Lancaster Sound. He then declared that the Sound was blocked by a chain of mountains (which he named the Croker mountains), and he turned around and came home, much to the surprise of his junior officers, who could not see the mountains at all. Barrow was furious with Ross, and guaranteed that he would never get another command (which he did not). Barrow promptly sent Ross’s second-in-command, Edward Parry, back the next year, and Parry sailed right though the phantom Croker mountains and made it half-way across Canada. However, Ross’s book about his voyage of 1818 was a beautiful production and shows that he did far more than twiddle his thumbs up there in Baffin Bay, even if he did turn back prematurely. All the images on this page were taken from his book, A Voyage of Discovery (1819). We displayed this work in our 2008 exhibition, Ice: A Victorian Romance, where you can see some other images from this pioneering work.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(Source: lhldigital.lindahall.org, via arcticmuseum)

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oldcanada:

oldcanada:

Ottawa, Ontario 1891
Old Parliament Buildings

Repost
State funeral of Sir John A. MacDonald on Parliament Hill, June 10, 1891.
Source

oldcanada:

oldcanada:

Ottawa, Ontario 1891

Old Parliament Buildings

Repost

State funeral of Sir John A. MacDonald on Parliament Hill, June 10, 1891.

Source

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June 3, 1862 - James Isbister, a Métis interpreter for the Hudson’s Bay Company, sets up a farm on the lower North Saskatchewan River on the site of what is now the city of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. 

June 3, 1862 - James Isbister, a Métis interpreter for the Hudson’s Bay Company, sets up a farm on the lower North Saskatchewan River on the site of what is now the city of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. 

(Source: ww2.glenbow.org)

Video

June 1, 1813 - The H.M.S. Shannon under Captain Philip Bowes Vere Broke defeats the U.S.S. Chesapeake under Captain James Lawrence in a naval engagement off of Boston. The Chesapeake is towed to Halifax as a prize.

Tags: War of 1812
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The Celtic cross erected on Grosse Île in 1909 to commemorate the predominantly Irish victims of the 1847 typhus epidemic.

The Celtic cross erected on Grosse Île in 1909 to commemorate the predominantly Irish victims of the 1847 typhus epidemic.

(Source: collectionscanada.gc.ca)

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The Great Potato Famine in Ireland in the years 1845-1849 forced thousands of Irishmen to flee their home country. One of their destinations was Quebec, Canada. The Canadian government chose Grosse Island, in the Gulf of St Lawrence, as the island to house Irish immigrants before allowing them to enter Canada.
From 1832 to 1848, thousands of Irish immigrants landed on Grosse Island—and many of them would never leave. Over 5,000 Irish were buried on Grosse Island—a fact which makes it the largest Irish Potato Famine cemetery outside Ireland.
In the year 1847, a massive typhus outbreak killed thousands on the island and aboard the ships. For those passengers lucky enough to get off the ships, perfunctory health checks allowed thousands of desperate and sick immigrants to leave the island and make their way to cities such as Montreal, risking further spread of the epidemic. “Fever sheds” were set up in Montreal to try to isolate these infected and sick people, and it is estimated that as many as 6000 additional victims died there. Incidentally, one immigrant who did make it off Grosse Island safely was the grandfather of Henry Ford.

The Great Potato Famine in Ireland in the years 1845-1849 forced thousands of Irishmen to flee their home country. One of their destinations was Quebec, Canada. The Canadian government chose Grosse Island, in the Gulf of St Lawrence, as the island to house Irish immigrants before allowing them to enter Canada.

From 1832 to 1848, thousands of Irish immigrants landed on Grosse Island—and many of them would never leave. Over 5,000 Irish were buried on Grosse Island—a fact which makes it the largest Irish Potato Famine cemetery outside Ireland.

In the year 1847, a massive typhus outbreak killed thousands on the island and aboard the ships. For those passengers lucky enough to get off the ships, perfunctory health checks allowed thousands of desperate and sick immigrants to leave the island and make their way to cities such as Montreal, risking further spread of the epidemic. “Fever sheds” were set up in Montreal to try to isolate these infected and sick people, and it is estimated that as many as 6000 additional victims died there. Incidentally, one immigrant who did make it off Grosse Island safely was the grandfather of Henry Ford.

(Source: listverse.com, via irish-history)

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March 26, 1832 - The Legislature of Lower Canada authorizes the establishment of a quarantine station on Grosse Île in the St. Lawrence River.
During 1847, over 5,000 immigrants bound for Quebec died at sea and another 5,424 are buried at Grosse Île. Many were fleeing the Irish potato famine and the western cemetery on the island is now recognized as holding the largest number of victims of the Great Famine outside of Ireland.

March 26, 1832 - The Legislature of Lower Canada authorizes the establishment of a quarantine station on Grosse Île in the St. Lawrence River.

During 1847, over 5,000 immigrants bound for Quebec died at sea and another 5,424 are buried at Grosse Île. Many were fleeing the Irish potato famine and the western cemetery on the island is now recognized as holding the largest number of victims of the Great Famine outside of Ireland.

Photoset

jakealoo:

Photogravures of Ottawa near the turn of the last century, including one of the original Centre Block on Parliament Hill. The Centre Block was destroyed by fire on Feb. 3, 1916 and replaced by the Peace Tower. It was named in honour of the Canadian soldiers who died in the First World War and took 11 years to construct.

(via oldcanada)